Kuntergrau: Season 3 is Now Available

In the German series Kuntergrau, coming out is part of the past while sex and love is mundane. A group of five gay friends between seventeen and twenty-four years old deal with everyday problems and experience the meaning of love, sex, and friendship.

The show focuses on Leopold (Marcel Meyer) who does not want to identify himself through his sexuality and Noah (Daniel Printz), whose BDSM fetish challenges his ex-boyfriend, Jan (Fabian Freistühler), to the point where their relationship begins to break. Along with them are the promiscuous Marcel (Moustafa Tarraf), who works as a banker and is learning to live day-by-day as HIV positive. Last but not least, Lukas (Daniel Kosic) moves from the country to the big city to get away from his controlling parents… somewhat unsuccessfully.

The lives of these five men soon become intertwined and what results is a story that encapsulates what it means to be a young gay man in a big city.

Season 3 of Kuntergrau is now available on Dekkoo! Catch up on Seasons 1 and 2 as well!

https://www.dekkoo.com/kuntergrau

Short Film Spotlight: Touchscreen

Brian (Kelly Miller) drifts through life using a computer monitor as his window to the world outside. He hooks up with men online, remotes into his office, and FaceTimes with family, unable to connect meaningfully with the people on the other side of his screen.

After an online encounter with the charming Dom (Jose Joaquin Perez), Brian is faced with an unusual request: a virtual sleepover.

Brian succumbs to Dom’s proposition, and is transported (then spooked) by the sweet hints of intimacy that permeate the laptop screen.

Later, when Dom asks to meet him in person, Brian conjures an alternate reality; one in which he shatters his long-lived inhibitions to claim the warm touch of another human being. Dom persists until Brian replies: a small step for man – with momentous implications.

From writer-star Kelly Miller and Arthur Halpern, Touchscreen is a smart new short film about one man’s self-imposed isolation, and how the technologies and social platforms meant to connect us – to lovers, to family, to work – are misused to reinforce that isolation. The film was chosen as a selection at countless film festivals all over the globe.

Watch the trailer for Touchscreen below. The full 15-minute short is available now on Dekkoo.

Don’t miss the taut gay thriller Last Ferry

Joseph (Ramon O. Torres), a young lawyer living in Harlem, makes a pilgrimage to the fabled Fire Island, desperately seeking romance and community. Only trouble is, it’s April, the thick of the off-season, and the island is dead.

Joseph does meet a cute boy – but only to realize he is a mugger who has drugged him to steal his belongings.

During his impaired state, he witnesses a murder and narrowly escapes the grasp of the murderer. He awakes in The Pines, under the care of Cameron (Sheldon Best) and his friends.

As Joseph integrates into the group and begins to fall for Cameron, he forgets about what he witnessed when he was drugged – only for the murderer to reemerge right under his nose.

Shot on location with gorgeous cinematography, Last Ferry is a taut thriller with a distinctly gay sensibility.

Watch the trailer for Last Ferry below. The film is available now on Dekkoo.

Now Available: The Goddess of Fortune

Arturo (Stefano Accorsi) and Alessandro (Edoardo Leo) have been a couple for over fifteen years. Even though their passion and love have formed a close and important affection, their relationship has been in crisis for a long time.

The sudden arrival of two children, left in their care for a few days by Annamaria (Jasmine Trinca), Alessandro’s best friend, could give an unexpected turn to their tired routine.

The solution will be a crazy departure for them both. But on the other hand, love is a state of pleasant madness.

Written and directed by Ferzan Ozpetek, the acclaimed filmmaker behind Steam: The Turkish Bath and His Secret Life, The Goddess of Fortune is a touching drama about finding family in an unlikely way.

Watch the trailer for The Goddess of Fortune below. The film is available now on Dekkoo.

The Dekkoo Original Series HERE COMES YOUR MAN is Now Available!

Two very different young men come together in Here Comes Your Man, a brand-new Dekkoo Original Series that follows their relationship, from beginning to end.

When Jordan (Calvin Picou) and Aaron (Jason Alan Clark) meet in person after exchanging pics and pleasantries on a hook-up app, it’s nervous attraction at first sight. Their initial tryst is fraught with the kind awkward tension that suggests they might not be a perfect match.

On top of that, Aaron is unaware that Jordan is, for all intents and purposes, “straight.” Confused about his sexuality and faking his way through a hetero relationship, Jordan blocks Aaron’s number. When they run into each other in a gay bar weeks later, the truth comes out… and they both find that there is something undeniable about their strange romantic chemistry.

A charming, funny, sexy and refreshingly realistic new 5-episode Dekkoo Original Series from creator/director Omar Salas Zamora, Here Comes Your Man takes us through the entirety of Aaron and Jordan’s tumultuous relationship, jumping father forward in time with each successive episode to show us the most pivotal moments.

Watch the trailer for Here Comes Your Man below. The full first season is now available on Dekkoo!

Short Film Spotlight: It’s Just in My Head

Andreas and Alessandro (Claudio Segaluscio and Carmine Fabbricatore) are two friends who have known each other since childhood.

Now that they have grown up, they study at universities in different cities, but they always spend the summer together in the place where they were born: a seaside resort that regularly fills up with tourists every year.

The two men have opposing characteristics. Andreas is taciturn and diffident, while Alessandro is expansive and optimistic. Andreas is lonely and without many sexual experiences. Alessandro has a life full of friends – and is already engaged to a girl.

With Summer now coming to an end, both Andreas and Alessandro will soon return to the city to resume their college lives. But before leaving, Andreas decides to give Alessandro a gift. He leaves an envelope full of printed selfies in his friend’s mailbox, some of which are dedicated on the back, hoping that Alessandro will finally be able to notice the love that Andreas always has tried to hide.

A touching 17-minute short film from Italian writer-director Marius Gabriel Stancu, It’s Just in My Head is now available on Dekkoo. Watch the trailer below.

Drag Race star Jamal Sims directs the electric new dance documentary When the Beat Drops

The new dance documentary When the Beat Drops invites you to drop into the electric and subversive underground dance scene known as bucking.

As voguing exploded out of the ballroom scene of NYC, bucking was boldly pioneered in the clubs of the Deep South as a new form of self-expression.

When the Beat Drops presents a fresh glimpse into the magnetic artistry and flair behind this emerging dance culture.

In his feature debut, famed choreographer and filmmaker Jamal Sims – who has worked with the likes of Madonna and Jennifer Lopez, and appeared countless times as a judge and choreographer on “RuPaul’s Drag Race” – illuminates the warm-hearted and fierce queer black performers who make up one of the leading “bucking” groups in the city of Atlanta.

As they train for their biggest competition yet, they face the risk of losing their jobs and family to compete at the top levels of this dance scene.

Jamal Sims calls dance a “super power,” and with this film he crafts a vision of the power of dance to bring movement to new heights and elevate the queer community.

Watch the trailer for When the Beat Drops below. The film is available now on Dekkoo.

Short Film Spotlight: Brothers

Winner of ten different jury and audience awards at various film festivals, the new short film Brothers follows a Muslim Arab boy who realizes he is different. Fortunately, he has an older brother who stands by him and encourages him to always be himself, even in the face of bias and adversity.

Written and directed by Mike Mosallam, the acclaimed filmmaker behind the series All-American Muslim and the recent gay romantic comedy hit Breaking Fast, this short film aims to shed light on LGBTQ+ oppression in a familial, religious space that has yet to be portrayed on screen.

Watch the official teaser trailer for Brothers below. The film is available now on Dekkoo.

Sorry Angel is a mature, deeply emotional reflection on love, loss, youth and aging

Paris, 1993. Jacques (Pierre Deladonchamps) is a semi-renowned writer and single father in his thirties trying to maintain his sense of romance and humor in spite of the turmoil in his life and the world.

While on a work trip to Brittany, he meets Arthur (Vincent Lacoste), an aspiring filmmaker in his early twenties, who is experiencing a sexual awakening and eager to get out of his parochial life. Arthur becomes instantly smitten with the older man.

From writer-director Christophe Honoré (Love Songs, Dans Paris) comes a mature and deeply emotional reflection on love and loss, and youth and aging.

In its intergenerational snapshot of cruising, courtship and casual sex – Jacques’ forty-something neighbor Mathieu (Denis Podalydès) rounds out the triumvirate – Sorry Angel balances hope for the future with agony over the past in an unforgettable drama about finding the courage to love in the moment.

Watch the trailer for Sorry Angel below. The film is now available on Dekkoo.

Director Omar Zúñiga talks The Strong Ones

Omar Zúñiga is an Audiovisual Director and B.A. in Aesthetics from Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, and also holds an M.F.A. from the Graduate Film Program at New York University, which he attended with scholarships from the Fulbright Program, Chile’s Ministry of Education and Tisch School of the Arts.

He directed Academy Award® nominee James Franco and Zach Braff in a segment of the film The Color of Time. He premiered his short San Cristóbal at the Berlinale in 2015, where it won Teddy Award for the Best Short Film.

His first feature, The Strong Ones, received both the Grand Jury Prize for Best International Narrative and the Audience Award at OutFest Los Angeles 2020.

The Strong Ones is now available on Dekkoo. Here’s some of what Zúñiga had to say about the film below.

What was the starting point for The Strong Ones?

I started writing in 2014. At that moment, I was living in the United States. I had directed various projects in English, and at that moment I strongly felt the need to make something that was much closer to my life experiences, to the culture I know, to the kinds of characters and lives that I wanted to represent. I wanted to tell a love story that was romantic and genuine, honest with the things that I know and that I have seen around me.

I also wanted to make a film that was current and political, in which these two men will not let themselves be pushed over by any hostility they may find around them, in which they are able to fight for their place in the world, for the dignity that they define for themselves. This hostility does not define them, their humanity does. The ways that they are different from each other, the ways in which they both try to get to another stage of their adulthood. For me, the film is a romance and also a coming of age, in which they both take risks, and in which they take steps to their own independence.

Films working on same sex relationships sometimes do it from the violence, the discrimination, the pain. What motivated you to take it from love? What difference does The Strong Ones have with other romantic films?

In a very deliberate way, when we had the chance to make this film, we wanted to focus our resources, our talents, our light, in telling a story that celebrated this love and the bravery these two characters have in front of the world, in a way that I have not seen enough of. Homophobia exists in Chile; it is brutal and painful. There are macabre attacks periodically, and there is still a social dimension to it as well. However, our focus is not on this violence, and in my opinion, the film presents in a plausible and realistic way the different reactions that they face around them: sometimes clumsy rejection, sometimes unconditional support, sometimes the town’s anonymous hostility. I feel that this is honest with our country in this moment in time and with the experiences that I know.

I also wanted to talk about a love that had no reservations. It is not a story of discovery, it is a love story that does not involve the idea of guilt, the idea of what they are doing is wrong. It does not cease to surprise me how many films that revolve around same sex relationships fall time and time again in the pattern of one the participants thinking or feeling that what they are going through is something that must be hidden. Even films that are received by mainstream audiences. This is ethically foul for me, and we wanted to remove ourselves from that. I wanted to celebrate their freedom, their autonomy, the courage they have when they allow themselves to be vulnerable with one another.

Finally, I also think that we are unconsciously trained by narrative conventions to expect epic narratives about love, where people leave everything behind for it. I wanted to tell a different story in this sense, more adult, closer to life, with a love that has other ways of being epic.

How was the casting process?

When I started writing the film I wanted to work with Antonio Altamirano: we had met years prior because we had made our first short film together, me as a director and him as an actor. There is a feeling of resilience and strength in Antonio the character, who is very clear with what he thinks, with defending his way of looking at the world. I am not sure why exactly, but I was confident that Antonio could bring this to the screen.

For the other character, Lucas, I was not so sure. It is a more mysterious character, who leaves some of his own shortcomings behind during the film. A common friend introduced me to Samuel González, and when we met, we connected very quickly, we talked about many things beyond the story in particular. We realized that in many ways, the film was as personal to him as it was to me, with experiences that we had both lived. I was very interested in that, and it made us trust each other profoundly.

We did not do formal auditions. For me, it was about the person behind the actor: the experiences that shape us as human beings, the things we have lived or the things we think about the world. I believe that inevitably that makes it to the screen somehow. With Marcela Salinas and Rafael Contreras, it was a similar process, and also with other actors that are featured.

Why did you choose the south of Chile as the context?

From the beginning I wanted the film to have that atmosphere, defined by the immensity of the ocean, and the omnipresence of the rain, the water and the forests. In the Corral Bay in particular there is also a system of Spanish forts that were key in the conquest period, and that centuries later were a part of the independentist movement. These buildings have been standing for centuries, resisting the waves crashing against them. I see them as a vestige of resilience, and in way this echoes the relationship between Lucas and Antonio, who have to resist other kinds of waves.

Also, I was interested in a very specific culture: the local fishing, marked by the dignity of the trade, by the stoicism and the fortitude, by the pride that a community has for the life it leads. This is embodied by Antonio, who defends his side of the river, his way of looking at the world, the life he chooses to carry. I think that sometimes there is a paternalistic view of the trades, or of the hostility: if you find it, change the life you have. I wanted to defend a different notion, conscious of dignity, conscious that all of us deserve to live the life we want in the place where our affections exist.

I spent a lot of time in the area in different occasions before the shooting, observing, visiting places and getting to know people. I wanted to make a portrait that felt authentic. I believe that the process previous to filming, which was years, was key for that.