A thoughtful LGBTQI doc takes a look at what lies Between the Shades

The documentary Between the Shades seeks to put faces to the letters that make up LGBTQI and examine how those individual letters, and the groups they represent, have evolved and expanded since the Stonewall riots. All the while the film also takes a look at the immense power of labels and the transcendence of love.

Director Jill Salvino invited fifty people, each with a connection to the LGBTQI community, to begin a conversation by sharing their stories. Between the Shades features many voices, among them: Beth Malone (of Broadway’s “Fun Home”), actress Kathy Najimy and former Democratic National Committee Treasurer Andrew Tobias. No film can ever capture the immense diversity of the LGBTQI community, but this film puts in a lot of effort to try.

The New York Times said that the film “suggests that human sexuality is far more nuanced than labels or even a linear scale can capture… it’s a conversation that feels right for the times in which we live.”

Watch the trailer for Between the Shades below. The film is now available on Dekkoo.

Game Face is an inspiring film about the coming out process of LGBTQ athletes

Day by day athletes are becoming more comfortable with their sexuality as sports associations begin to take proactive steps to accepting lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgender players in their respective teams or clubs. Yet surprisingly, a lot of homophobia remains in the world of professional and collegiate sports—making it extremely difficult to come out before their careers end. Some are forced to stay closeted by their entourage while others have been kicked off their team; bullied into secrecy; struggle in their careers while battling with self-identity; and tragically some commit suicide.

Some people still feel uncomfortable about having LGBT athletes in sports, and this is the perfect opportunity to finally break all stereotypes. With the documentary Game Face, director Michiel Thomas sheds light on the masses by debunking the myths and misgivings of the LGBT community and athletes. The important details to remember are found in the fact that these are people who have a passion and love for their respective sport, everything else is irrelevant. This film tells different stories from various athletes in their sport, covering a wide spectrum of issues.

Featuring figures such as transgender mixed-martial-arts fighter Fallon Fox and basketball hopeful Terrence Clemens, Game Face offers up an inspiring film about the coming out process of professional and college athletes.

Watch the trailer for Game Face below. The film is now available on Dekkoo.

Now Available: Bridegroom

Released originally in 2013, the emotional documentary Bridegroom follows the journey of Shane Bitney Crone and Tom Bridegroom, two young men in a loving and committed relationship – a relationship that was cut tragically short by a misstep off the side of a roof.

The story of what happened after this accidental death, before marriage equality, tells of how people without the legal protections of marriage found themselves completely shut out and ostracized. The film is poignant, enraging and opened a window onto the issue of marriage equality like no speech or lecture ever could.

On May 7, 2012, the anniversary of Tom’s death, Shane made a video tribute to his greatest love entitled “It Could Happen To You.” This film, posted on YouTube, earned over 2.7 million hits and inspired over 50 thousand e-mails and comments on YouTube and Facebook. The impact of Shane’s original film, and the raw nerve it touched, told an important story that needed to be brought to the world stage.

Watch the trailer for Bridegroom below. The film is available now on Dekkoo.

Short Film Spotlight: The Gay Rub

The Gay Rub is a project by Steven Reigns devoted to collecting rubbings from LGBTQ historical markers, signs, tombstones, cenotaphs, plaques, and monuments. By gathering LGBTQ rubbings from across the globe, these public historic commemorations can be viewed at once. LGBTQ history and landmarks are underrepresented and underappreciated. The Gay Rub’s aim is to help draw more attention to the markers and the LGBTQ significance that prompted them.

Steven Reigns is a Los Angeles-based poet and educator and was appointed the first Poet Laureate of West Hollywood. Alongside over a dozen chapbooks, he has published collections such as Inheritance and Your Dead Body is My Welcome Mat.

Reigns holds a BA in Creative Writing from the University of South Florida, a Master of Clinical Psychology from Antioch University, and is an eleven-time recipient of The Los Angeles County’s Department of Cultural Affairs’ Artist in Residency Grant. Currently he is touring The Gay Rub, an exhibition of rubbings from LGBT landmarks, facilitates the monthly Lambda Lit Book Club, and is at work on a new collection of poetry.

Director Michael J. Saul is fairly new to documentary filmmaking, but he was a pioneer in the San Francisco art and film scene of the 1980s, producing a series of experimental films with musical collaborator Steven M. Miller which found success in film festivals around the world. With the new short doc, The Gay Rub, Saul shines a spotlight on the important work that Reigns has been doing and offers viewers an exclusive look at this profoundly impressive collection.

The Gay Rub is now available on Dekkoo.

 

Pride Month Spotlight: Church & State

A surprise federal court ruling in 2013 legalized gay marriage for Utah – triggering a fierce battle in a state where Mormon church values control the Legislature and every aspect of public life.

Church & State, the bold, award-winning documentary from co-directors Holly Tuckett and Kendall Wilcox, tells the improbable story of a brash, inexperienced gay activist and a tiny Salt Lake City law firm that joined forces to topple Utah’s gay marriage ban.

The film’s ride on the bumpy road to equality in Utah offers a glimpse at the Mormon Church’s influence in state politics and the squabbles inside the gay community that nearly derailed a chance to make history.

Church & State is a story of triumph, setback and a little-known lawsuit that should have failed, but instead paved the way for the U.S. Supreme Court decision that legalized gay unions nationwide.

Watch the trailer for Church & State below. The film is now available on Dekkoo.

I Always Said Yes: The Many Lives of Wakefield Poole celebrates a queer filmmaking pioneer

I Always Said Yes: The Many Lives of Wakefield Poole tells the story of a sometimes-overlooked gay liberation and independent filmmaking pioneer.

In late 1971, Wakefield Poole, a respected Broadway dancer and choreographer, had the audacity to put his real name above the title of his first film, a low- budget, hardcore gay erotic feature called Boys in the Sand. And to make sure everyone knew about it, Poole advertised the film in the New York Times, creating a sensation.

In an era when anyone making, promoting, or appearing in what the US government considered “pornography” could be liable for prosecution and jail time, Poole was a remarkably open and honest gay filmmaker. He became internationally famous and his movies screened for years as examples that films could be artistic as well as sexually explicit.

Director/Producer Jim Tushinski continues the exploration of art and sexuality he began in That Man: Peter Berlin, but this time around, the main character is not a cool, untouchable icon. Poole, now in his 80s, tells his own story, that of an outspoken and articulate artist in a turbulent, passionate time. He didn’t think of himself as a pornographer. He was a filmmaker who used his dance and theater background to create beautiful, erotic art films that “challenged the mind.”

To many, though, Poole just made dirty movies. But Poole was so much more than a filmmaker and his amazing life story leads him through twists and turns, triumphs and tragedies, and a number of remarkable reinventions.

Watch the trailer for I Always Said Yes: The Many Lives of Wakefield Poole below. The film is now available on Dekkoo.

Bringing Season 2 of “Interested In” to Life

Upon the release of season one of Interested In, the world fell in love with Parker, his hookup antics, and his parade of beautifully queer friends. Whether it was the hot guys or the heart of the show that got you hooked, it’s safe to say that we’re all interested in a second season. We got the chance to once again sit down with Michael Witkes—the creator of the show and the actor playing Parker—to talk about all things Interested In and how he’s gearing up for a fierce follow up.

Still from the new gay series Interested In - Now Available on Dekkoo!

Hi, Michael! It’s nice to talk to you again! How have you been since we last spoke?

Amazing! Interested In got it’s big release on Dekkoo! It’s been my gay little dream to be on a queer streaming site, and here we are. This project has been a huge labor of love. It’s been so validating to hear from the queer people who’ve shared their coming-of-age stories with me. I created this series because I was confused after I came out. At the time, I couldn’t find any media or entertainment that depicted my story. So it’s heartwarming to hear that other people from all over the world also find validation in Parker’s journey.

What’s been your favorite reaction?

After our world premiere at Cinema Diverse in Palm Springs, I talked at length about the series with an older man who was a part of the Black Cat riots in Los Angeles in the ‘60s. He was incredibly complimentary and was impressed with the unapologetic depiction of queer sex. We discussed the differences between dating now and when he was my age. He wasn’t even allowed to hold hands with another man in public! What an amazing opportunity it was to thank someone for creating a world where I’m allowed to create Interested In.

Still from the new gay series Interested In - Now Available on Dekkoo!

What was your favorite part of creating season one of Interested In?

It was probably filming. I love the bustle of an indie film set, and it was amazing seeing my vision come to life. We had such an amazing team working on the series, so filming was an absolute joy.

How did you feel after the series was released?

Since I couldn’t be there in the room with everyone as they watched the series, I had no idea how people were reacting at first. It’s been so nice to connect with people online. Also, every screening has been a joy. It’s sometimes hard for me to watch myself on screen—especially in awkward sexual situations—but hearing the audience react positively has been exhilarating.

You’re jumping right back into the ring for the second season. How long have you been working on this second chapter of this story?

It’s been five years in the making! I wrote the first draft during my junior year of college. I initially wrote the series as a play that performed at two different theaters, but I thought that it would work much better as a series. So, the first half of the play was made into season one, and the second half is getting made into season two! I’m very much ready to get the second act out there!

Still from the new gay series Interested In - Now Available on Dekkoo!

Can you tell us a little bit about the journey that Parker will be going on in season two?

I don’t want to give too much away, but we definitely see Parker coming into his identity and gaining confidence. Of course, there will be some major roadblocks along the way. I think people are really going to love this season.

Will we see some of the same beloved characters we saw in season one?

The upcoming season is ultimately about queer friendship, so Parker’s bestie, Danny, is definitely coming back and will play a bigger role. Also, the thing about queer dating and Grindr culture is that you can have these amazingly vulnerable, intimate moments with someone you just met and then never see them again. So, season two will remain true to that, but you might see a few more familiar faces along the way, too.

What do you think is going to be the biggest difference between the first and second seasons?

Season one was very much about building Parker’s world and seeing him be incredibly uncomfortable in his own skin. In season two, Parker delves much deeper into his identity and touches on issues of femininity, consent, sexual assault, and queer identity. Just like the first season, season two will be steamy (but still awkward, of course). We also might have some amazing cameos this time around, so stay tuned for that!

Still from the new gay series Interested In - Now Available on Dekkoo!

For those interested in learning more about season two and how they can help bring the vision to life, where can we go?

We’re currently running a crowdfunding campaign to bring season two to life! We’re approaching the finish line and getting closer to our $15K goal! We have to reach 80% of our goal to receive any of the funds, so if you want to see what happens to Parker in season two, your support is crucial to making that happen!

To help us out, you can make a pledge and follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and on our Seed&Spark page! Oh, and don’t forget to spread the love and share the series and our fundraiser with your friends and family! We’re so incredibly grateful to everyone who has helped make season one a success, and your continued support will allow us to make season two a reality!

Is there anything else you’d like your fans to know?

Thank you so much for watching the series and for your amazing messages! You’re the reason we’re making season two! I hope you enjoy it as much as we’re enjoying making it!

While you help bring season two of Interested In to life, why not give season one a rewatch! You can view it here, only on Dekkoo!

Don’t Miss the Critically-Acclaimed Doc Mala Mala

Mala Mala, the critically acclaimed documentary from directors Antonio Santini and Dan Sickles, explores the intimate moments, performances, friendships and activism of trans identifying people, drag queens and others who defy typical gender identities in Puerto Rico.

Still from Mala Mala

The film features Ivana, an activist; Soraya, an older sex-change pioneer; Sandy, a prostitute looking to make a change; and Samantha and Paxx, both of whom struggle with the quality of medical resources available to assist in their transition.

Still from Mala Mala

Hailed as “sensitive and thoughtful” by the New York Times  and winner of the audience award for documentary film at the Tribeca Film Festival, Mala Mala is a deeply involving piece of work which boldly affirms that the quest to find oneself can be both difficult and beautiful.

Still from Mala Mala

Watch the trailer for Mala Mala below. The film is currently available to stream on Dekkoo.

Saying Goodbye to “I’m Fine”: an interview with series creator Brandon Kirby

With the release of I’m Fine’s third and final season, everyone at Dekkoo is feeling a little bittersweet. I’m Fine was Dekkoo’s first foray into the world of original series, and we couldn’t be prouder! But all good things must come to an end, and what a way to go out! We sat down with the creator of the series, Brandon Kirby, to see if he’s really doing fine after the release of the series’ last installment.

Still from I'm Fine: Season 3

Will you tell us a little bit about yourself?

I grew up in Livonia, Michigan, and went to undergrad at Michigan State University. Shortly after graduation, I moved to L.A. in 2012 for an internship at The Hollywood Reporter. Classic L.A. move, I caught the screenwriting bug, and my career went from there. My first project was a web series I co-created with my writing partner at the time and still good friend, Jessie Katz; it was called The Exorcists, and somewhere in the bowels of YouTube, it can be found and watched. I also unfortunately star in it. The lessons learned from that project allowed me to go on and create I’m Fine.

What was your main source of inspiration for the series?

The main source of inspiration was a breakup, so a lot of the first season is based on a bad hookup I had post-breakup. Nate’s neuroses and bad decision making unfortunately mirrors my own. But once Perry Powell began to imbue Nate with his own nuances, the character evolved past any real-life touch points I had tethered the story to. Thankfully, all my actors were able to bring even more to their characters than I had anticipated, so I’m Fine as a series was quickly able to evolve beyond being semi-autobiographical despite many characters, situations, and even dialogue being pulled directly from my real life. These close ties to reality quickly dissipate by season two as the show’s storylines morphed and evolved into something greater.

Can you tell us a little about the inspiration for the title and how you decided on it?

In college, I would say “I’m fine” in a really weird, high-pitched, obviously not-fine tone, and it became a running joke with my friends. As I was writing the first episode, the title sort of came naturally from that.

Still from I'm Fine: Season 3

What was it like bringing other writers onto the show for the last season?

They brought a lot of new perspectives and experiences to the show. For example, in the third episode of season three, we wanted to continue exploring Jeff’s issues of identity, so Clay Pruitt tackled that episode working on a story concept from Lee Doud who plays Jeff. And for the sixth episode—written by Michael Varrati—it’s the story of two older gay men courting younger men at a bar. Varrati wanted to bring that specific perspective to the episode to put a discussion of the gay generational divide into our final season.

What was the casting process like for such a strong ensemble show?

It all started through friends and friends of friends. Perry Powell (Nate) came recommended through our Director of Photography—Andrew Ceperley—and then Lee Doud (Jeff) came through our producer—Albert Payano. From there, Brittney King (Nicole) and Richard Stokes (Andy) were also recommended through Perry, and Ulysses Morazan (Brian) came recommended through another season-one producer—Abram Cerda. As we got into season two, we brought on our amazing casting director, Leslie Wasserman, who stayed with us through the process of casting seasons two and three. She’s been an absolute godsend, and we couldn’t have successfully done our last two seasons without her!

How does it feel to have seen these characters grow from season one to season three?

It’s been a really wild experience seeing how much they’ve grown. I think each character goes on a relatable journey of self discovery, and the direction these characters take is largely owed to the actors bringing them to life. Thanks to them, the characters have gone places I never expected.

Throughout the series, there was an emphasis not only on romantic relationships but on platonic ones and ones where the lines blurred a little as well. Why did you decide to showcase this broad spectrum of relationships?

Since the show’s starting-off point was a breakup, my goal was to not entirely focus on romantic relationships. As the series began, I was much more interested in exploring gay male relationships—namely friendships—that sometimes enter the gray area of more than friends. I think that’s something so specific to gay men where if you’re friends, there’s always the possibility that one person might see the other as something more. And that’s where Nate and Jeff find their friendship headed in season two, and then they have to walk it back, deal with the falling out of one of them having feelings, and then land back in the realm of friendship.

Still from I'm Fine: Season 3

What would 15-year-old Brandon Kirby say about seeing something like I’m Fine on screen?

He would be shocked because 15-year-old me didn’t even have moving to L.A. on his radar. To see that his future self wrote and directed a show, he would be stunned. He probably would’ve gained a lot from it.

What do you think queer viewers will gain from this series?

I want them to see themselves and know that queer stories don’t all have to be tragic. Queer characters can exist in storytelling and media by just being themselves, living their lives, and fucking things up just like any other characters they might see in media.

What’s the main message you’d like your readers to walk away with after seeing I’m Fine?

We’re always growing, and we’re always on a journey. As queer people, we’re always trying to find our tribe, and the journey of self-identity is forever ongoing. We’re constantly redefining ourselves, changing our paths and friendships, and that’s okay. It’s all part of growing up, and sometimes, that means growing apart. I think that’s especially true for transplants moving to new cities and even more true for queer people. It’s all about finding your people, and sometimes, you have to go through a few rounds of figuring out what you want before you can land on what truly makes you happy.

How does it feel to have completed the third and final season of the show?

It feels bittersweet. I knew season three was the time to end the series, but it’ll definitely be weird not returning to these characters. The cast and crew feels the same way, but we’ll always have the friendships and the I’m Fine family we made along the way. Personally, it feels like I’m closing the chapter on that “Nate chapter” of my life, and so it’s a timely and fitting end.

Can you tell us something that was challenging about filming the series?

Budget is always something you’re fighting against when it comes to small projects such as this. Cutting corners, calling in favors, and finding every opportunity to save money is the name of the game.

Still from I'm Fine: Season 3

Can you share one of your favorite moments or memories on set?

On set during the filming of season three, we were shooting a nighttime pool scene, and our director—Andrew Ceperley—was setting up for the shot but wasn’t satisfied with the angle he was getting. The two characters were sitting with their feet dangling in the pool, so straight-on shots were limited since there was a body of water in front of them. But that didn’t stop Andrew from fully getting in the water to film the entire scene. He didn’t even take the time to take his jeans off, let alone his socks or shoes. It was a moment of pure dedication, and I don’t think I’ll ever forget it.

How does it feel to have I’m Fine featured on Dekkoo?

I’m so thankful it’s on a platform like Dekkoo, dedicated to telling exclusively queer stories. I hope being on here allows the show to reach more people!

Do you have any new projects you’re currently working on?

I have a short film also starring Lee Doud (Jeff) called Is This a Date? that’s currently in post-prod and will premiere on Dekkoo either later this year or early next. I also have a queer horror short, The More the Scarier, that will land on Dekkoo this Halloween. The production company I have with Michael Varrati called June Gloom Productions also has a short, The Office is Mine, that will be hitting the festival circuit this fall. We also have many more queer horror-genre stories in the works!

Where can we find you online?

You can find me on Twitter and Instagram. You can also find I’m Fine on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.

You can watch the third and final season of I’m Fine right now, available for streaming on Dekkoo!

Q&A with How to Get from Here to There writer-director Kevin James Thornton

Kevin James Thornton—the creator of How to Get From Here To There—is a man of many talents. From writing to directing to even scoring the film, Thornton used his diverse skill set to produce this emotionally visceral amalgam of a movie that seems to fall into the categories of drama, experimental, and sci-fi all at once. As our protagonist—known as Commander—deals with the loss of his mother, he also struggles with his past decisions that have left him alone and defeated. But what if our destinies aren’t set in stone? An encounter with a make-believe time machine from his childhood will allow Commander to explore just that.

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Tell us a little bit about who Kevin James Thornton is:

My life has taken a lot of weird tangents. I moved to Nashville about two decades ago with my band to pursue a record deal. We succeeded and toured for many years. I spent a little while doing comedy in Los Angeles and even wrote for the Huffington Post. Eventually, I started taking portraits and making short films and music videos. Today, I consider myself a full-time filmmaker. It really brings all of my life experiences together into one medium.

What was your main source of inspiration for the events that take place in this film?

I’ve always been fascinated with the idea that we create our own destinies. I wanted to make a movie about that. I also wanted to make a film that represented gay people in a way that didn’t just focus on the struggle of being gay. There’s a lot of my life in it, of course. I was in a bad relationship with an alcoholic. My mother is alive and well, though.

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A major theme in this film is time and how you can’t go back to the past but you can change the future. What does this mean to you specifically as a person?

It just resonates with me. Every single day, we all have limitless choices we can make stepping into tomorrow. For me, this theme carries a hopeful message.

The film’s protagonist is a gay man, yet you didn’t seem to waste much time on themes of gay shame or the coming-out experience. Was that a deliberate choice?

Representation is important and necessary. I love all the films about the queer struggle from Brokeback Mountain to Boy Erased to Philadelphia. But I also want myself and other filmmakers to begin to add to the dialogue. There’s so much to explore, and I’m excited that it’s starting to happen and that I get to be a part of it.

This film takes its audience on a roller coaster of emotions to different worlds well beyond that of reality through the lens of a toy that the protagonist made as a boy. Why do you think breaking away from reality into the realm of metaphor was important to telling this story?

I love using childhood imagination to show adult emotion. It makes the film more moving. Toy Story 3 is a great example of that. It reaches into an innocent part of us and resonates in a different way.

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Another unique aspect of the film is its use of actors that don’t fall into the stereotypical “Hollywood twink” category. What do you think queer viewers will gain from seeing these realistic men on screen as opposed to the glamorized, Hollywood versions we’ve all come to expect?

Wait. I’m not a twink? Kidding. That’s SO BORING. In my experience, a lot of gay men like big hairy man bodies and rugged faces. But eye candy is probably pretty clearly not the focus of this film. That said, you have to admit Daniel Mark Collins is pretty stunning.

As a musician, did you have a big part in sonically shaping the film?

I did. I wrote, performed, and recorded it all with the help of my band, Indiana Queen.

What would the Kevin James Thornton from fifteen years ago think after seeing this film?

Considering that I was on tour full-time with my band fifteen years ago, my first question would be, “Wait, does the record-deal thing not work out?” But then I’d get really excited about seeing all of my creativity come together in a film.

If you were given the option to either travel back in time or into the future, which would you pick?

With the way things are in the world right now, I’m a little scared of the future, so I’m going to pick the past. I’d go back to 1950s Manhattan, get a funky apartment in Greenwich Village, and hunt down James Dean to make him love me.

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How does it feel to have How To Get From Here To There on Dekkoo? What do you think the platform will do for your film, and what do you think the film will do for Dekkoo’s viewers?

I am so thrilled to have my film on Dekkoo. Having my first feature on a legitimate platform is such a huge accomplishment for me. I hope the viewers love it. I really tried to make something outside of the box.

What are your future plans?

I’m in pre-production for a series I wrote called Stranger Hearts. It’s about several diverse LGBTQ people whose lives all cross and connect in profound ways. We’re shooting it in July, and it’s going to be really good!

Where can viewers find you online to learn more?

If you want to keep up with me and my various projects, you can visit my website, the Indiana Queen website, and the site for Stranger Hearts.

Available for streaming on Dekkoo’s diverse selection of gay films and series, you can watch How To Get From Here To There right now!