Real Boy tells the story of a son’s transition and a mom’s transformation

Real Boy is an intimate story of a family in transition. As 19-year-old Bennett Wallace navigates early sobriety, late adolescence, and the evolution of his gender identity, his mother makes her own transformation from resistance to acceptance of her trans son. Along the way, both mother and son find support in their communities, reminding us that families are not only given, but chosen.

Director/producer Shaleece Haas balances the poignancy and humor in this terrific new documentary, using intimate character-driven storytelling that invites the audience deep into the interior world of the protagonists.

Screened more than 180 times in 23 different countries, earning a total of 20 awards, Real Boy was broadcast in the United States on PBS’ Independent Lens and now it’s available for all to enjoy on Dekkoo!

 

 

 

An interview with Mark Wilshin, the director of ‘Sodom’

Following the tentative relationship that forms between two strangers – a twenty-year old footballer and a slightly older concert pianist – the new romance Sodom is coming to Dekkoo on August 30th. While we’re waiting, enjoy this interview with the film’s writer-director Mark Wilshin.

Pip Brignall and Jo Weil in Sodom – Coming Soon to Dekkoo

Where did the idea for the story for Sodom come from?

Well, as a first-time writer-director, I was very conscious of the fact that I had to write a film that could be produced on no budget. So the idea of the huis clos was there from the beginning, a very simple story of two men, one night and one location. But distilling into that night, two pivotal moments in the lives of two very different men. I’ve always admired this kind of intimate, quietly emotional film, and it seemed like it was something that would also be possible on a microbudget, while putting performance and emotional narrative to the fore.

For the title, you make no direct reference to the biblical story of Sodom. Why this title?

Well, in previous versions there was a biblical quotation, and even a brilliant quotation from Pauline Kael about watching old movies “Like Lot’s wife, we are tempted to take another look, attracted not by evil but by something that seems much more shameful – our own innocence.” But in the end, I decided to leave the interpretation of the story of Sodom and Gomorrah up to the audience. I was also quite fascinated by it as a title. It’s perhaps reminiscent of Pasolini’s Saló – powerful and provocative, but also conjures up images of Oscar Wilde and the 9th Marquess of Queensberry and the slurs that have been cast against the gay community for hundreds of years. It’s because of these connotations, that the title remains something of a taboo – Matteo Garrone, for example, chose Gomorra instead. There’s something implicitly “gay” about it, and so I felt it was important to kind of own that, by examining the darkness at the heart of sexuality. Which, for me, has nothing to do with sex, but with internalised feelings of homophobia that as individuals and as a community, we may still have to overcome.

Pip Brignall in Sodom – Coming Soon to Dekkoo

So, in what way do you think Sodom reflects the issues facing gay people today?

I think there is the feeling that, as we reach gay marriage and equality throughout the western world, that for gay men and women living in Europe there is nothing left to do. But I don’t agree with that. I think there is still a lot to do in terms of gay rights, particularly to do with how gay men perceive themselves and how they feel they are perceived by other people. But when Michael says, “I just want straight people to realize I could be you and you could be me”, that says as much about gay identity as it does about society. I think there’s a perception of tolerance, and while there is a general consensus of tolerance, as we’ve seen in the UK post-Brexit, hate crimes are on the increase.

The silent minority are revealing their true feelings. And silence doesn’t mean tolerance. We can’t be happy with just a majority, we have to keep going. We can’t stop until it’s not even a question any more. Despite its subject matter, Sodom wasn’t written for a gay audience; it’s a universal film designed to show some of the emotions and conflicts that we might have. I can’t speak for what other people may have gone through, so I wrote about my own experiences. And I hope for that reason it’s a very honest film.

It’s an autobiographical film then?

The film is autobiographical in many ways, but there are a lot of fictional elements woven in. Both the characters and stories are very personal in many ways, but it was the guts of the story – of a gay man living a straight lie – that was an important subject for me to broach. It’s very easy to be judgmental, but I wanted to try to be sympathetic towards the men and women who end up living those lives. And I wanted to bring Will as close to the other side, as close to self-acceptance or truth as possible. At the beginning he’s not really aware, you know. He’s young, having a good time and he doesn’t think too much about it. It’s not a big issue for him. And there’s a generational difference here between Michael and Will. As much as he says it’s not black or white, it’s much more like that for him, while the younger generation is perhaps more interested in the grey.

Perhaps that’s part of Will’s inability to embrace the label “gay”. Although for me, that isn’t something we should obscure, but rather something we should challenge ourselves to accept and be proud of.

Pip Brignall and Jo Weil in Sodom – Coming Soon to Dekkoo

But it’s not a gay film?

Sodom is a lot to do with these internalized feeling of homophobia and confusion. And in one way, it’s just a very simple non-coming-out story. But it’s also set in a time and place that is universal. We see modern gadgets such as mobile phones, but through the styling and costumes, we tried to keep it to a minimum to show that this is a universal story that keeps recurring. Of course, it still happens in the West. But even if it doesn’t happen in this unnamed city in 2016, it did still happen here previously. And if not here, then somewhere else.

In terms of Sodom being a universal film, yes, we see Will battling his demons and trying to find the courage to come out as a gay man. But it’s also a universal story of courage, about finding the courage to be who we are and to be true to oneself. I wrote a lot of the script about my journey towards becoming a filmmaker, and the invisible walls I would have to hurdle to make it. Coming out makes for a nice metaphor about realizing one’s dreams, about self-belief and trying to escape the confines of other people’s expectations. Trying to escape the closet of daily life and go beyond that, trying to cast myself out of that role and into a different one.

In that way, Sodom is about change and the ability to change. And while it’s not always easy, there is hope that change is possible, as long as we have the courage to see it through. I don’t think I could have made a film if my first feature hadn’t been about courage in some way. There are so many insecurities and doubts when making this kind of fundamental life-change. But I was always confronted with a story reminding me not to give up. Or turn back.

Like Lot’s wife, you mean?

Yes, this idea of turning back is central to Sodom. It comes of course from the biblical story of Sodom where Lot and his wife are chosen by angels to leave their sinful town of Sodom before God destroys it. They head for the hills with their daughters, and when Lot’s wife looks back at the destruction, she is turned into a pillar of salt. Perhaps for disobeying a command from God, perhaps regretting the life she’s leaving behind or perhaps unable to take her eyes off this divine destruction. But this idea of looking back is very important to the film. It happens throughout the film as Will hesitates between staying and leaving. Even at the end, when he makes his final decision to leave, it’s not 100% final. He doesn’t go back this time, but he looks back and sees the destruction he’s leaving behind. And he sees the attraction in another man’s eyes. He crawls back into a life that no longer fits him, but that night has become part of him. And it’s a part of him he can no longer deny. Something in him has died. His innocence perhaps. Like a metaphorical pillar of salt.

Pip Brignall and Jo Weil in Sodom – Coming Soon to Dekkoo

Salt is more than just a metaphor in the film though?

It’s a strange metaphor – that can have a lot of (often contradictory) meanings all at once. There’s Patricia Highsmith’s “The Price of Salt” for example, the novel that Carol is based on, but salt in the novel is barely even mentioned. And yet it’s something to do with courage, identity and sex.

In Sodom though, salt is littered throughout the film. There’s the salt of the tequila, and the salt they both reach for. And in some ways it refers to the biblical use of salt – as a sign of hospitality. But it’s also to recognize salt as a life-giving force. Without it we have no ability to move our muscles or send electrical impulses to the brain, so it’s a very important element in terms of human activity, both for the body and for the mind.

The saltwater fantasies tie into the idea of the pillar of salt that Lot’s wife is turned into. Both Will and Michael become infused with salt, and these moments that flash before their eyes only occur when there’s an intimate exchange. They both exist on this other plane beyond the goings on in the apartment, this sea of love, which petrifies in Will as he heads down into the underground.

And so Michael is destroyed, like the Cities of the Plain?

Yes, only not by God but by man. Michael tells us a lot about his coming out and his perceptions of being gay, but there are other parts of his character that remain hidden. Michael doesn’t reveal himself. He’s a private person suffering from his own grief. And we’re never quite sure how much of his story about Peter is true or not. Before he meets Will, he’s picking up straight tourists on the street – the very definition of non-committal. But through Will he’s able to open himself up to relationships again. Still, it was important for me that his partner had died. As within this apartment, which may or may not even exist, there’s a whole encapsulation of gay culture, and death is part of that. Whether we lived through the AIDS crisis or not, it’s still present, and still part of the culture that we take on.

It was also important for me to have a kind of fraternity between them. The suggestion of a kind of gay community through their mentor-protégé relationship, which seldom exists in the gay world, but which could be a positive force for good for young men and women coming out. There’s the possibility that Will and Michael could be two halves of the same person, the younger self and the older self. In a way, it’s an internal conversation between two halves of the brain about what as a younger person you might want to hear from your older self.

Pip Brignall and Jo Weil in Sodom – Coming Soon to Dekkoo

We almost see that when Will’s reflection overlaps his vision of Michael on the balcony.

Yes, and it comes at a pivotal moment after Will is no longer able to deny the truth. It’s slightly cruel of Michael to force Will in this way into accepting himself, but there’s also a long history of gay men being tested with fantasy images to uncover their hidden sexuality. And these fantasies also tie into a wider theme of seeing and vision in the film. We see Will wearing eye makeup from the beginning. Yes, he’s on his stag do, naked and tied to a lamppost, stripped of the wedding dress he would have been wearing, but the makeup highlights his eyes. And seeing is a theme that recurs with things like the lights on the ceiling or Michael’s references to cinema, also on the balcony and when Will is handcuffed to the stool. He alludes to cinema a couple of times which, for me, was a way to position the film within its own fantasy space, but to also highlight the film’s intentions, somewhere in between naturalistic, observational drama and something more story driven. Michael says to look through the windows into the darkness and there’s an idea that Sodom, or cinema in general, isn’t all about the bright lights of action and activity. But it’s the small stories in the dark that are important, that reveal something about who we are.

Is this how you see the fantasies? As a film within a film?

I think the fantasies are a little unconventional in this modern age of naturalistic cinema. But for me it was very important to include them, because I think the way sexuality is developed is largely through fantasy and visions of desire. Sexuality is a construct that comes first through mental processes before finding its way into action. And the fantasies relate to that. Will’s sexuality develops through fantasies of Michael, but also through seeing himself as an object. The way that we see him at the lamppost. And in Sodom there’s a conscious objectification of men, through each other, as a kind of re-balance to the objectification of women in cinema. I don’t think it’s possible, where desire or the sexual gaze is concerned, to prevent people from becoming objectified. But I think we can accept objectification as a corollary of desire. And it can become equalized in terms of sexual relationships, where we are simultaneously both subject and object.

Jo Weil in Sodom – Coming Soon to Dekkoo

There are a lot of dialectics in the film. To what extent is Sodom a European film?

I think for Will, Michael and his apartment represents a world he couldn’t even dream of. But that’s perhaps more a question of their class difference than their nationalities. I think though it is possible to read Sodom as a post-Brexit film, as the story of a British man who comes to Europe, flirts with it, but who ultimately is unable to enter into a relationship with it.

The film itself though could hardly be more European; I’m a Brit, living in Berlin; the film is both German and British; and the crew was made up of people from all over Europe – Ireland, France, Italy, Switzerland and Russia. More than that though, I think Sodom challenges perceptions of gay and straight. We know nothing about Will at the beginning, except that he’s wearing make-up. So maybe we make assumptions about that. Already within the script, the film broaches the subject of being gay and looking gay, and this idea of conforming to the straight model – whether that’s through echoing straight ideals of family and marriage or the current trend of hyper-masculinity. We might think Will’s just in denial, but I think it’s more complex than that. I think both characters challenge the black-and-white thinking of sexuality in different ways. At least I hope they do.

So what’s next? Will we see a second feature?

I hope so. I’m currently working on a screenplay, similar in many ways, only perhaps even more stringent – with one principle character rather than two. It takes place over one day, the last day in the life of Montgomery Clift. And while Sodom is a film about courage and shame, this will be a film about pride. It’s about the conflict between wanting to be out, and the impossibility of it. As in this case, it would blow away an acting career. Which of course, is an issue that still exists today. It’s the conflict between doing what you want and being who you are. Which of course, nowadays is a conflict no-one should have to face just because they’re gay. But the self-hatred then was so internalized, it caused personalities to splinter.

 

OUT.com – “Paper Boys: The Gay-Straight Friendship Story We Haven’t Seen Yet”

Bobby Schuessler over at OUT.com sat down with Curtis Casella, writer/producer/director of the new Dekkoo-original series ‘Paper Boys’ to discuss what Schuessler calls, “…the game-changing new series…”

Be sure to check out the complete interview over at OUT.com.

The first season of ‘Paper Boys’ is now available to binge-watch exclusively on Dekkoo!

An interview and GORGEOUS photo shoot with Miles Szanto, star of ‘Teenage Kicks’

‘Teenage Kicks’ is the gutsy coming of age feature film debut from director Craig Boreham that has earned him the accolade of being a compelling new voice in Australian queer cinema.

The film stars Miles Szanto as Mik, a young man with an explosive burgeoning sexuality as he navigates a minefield of adolescence and his growing attraction to his best friend Dan. Miles received the Best Actor Award for the role at the prestigious Iris Prize in Wales with the festival jury saying “Miles Szanto’s performance was amazing. The juxtaposition between physical strength and emotional vulnerability was mesmerizing.”

‘Teenage Kicks’ is available on Dekkoo so we caught up with Miles who is now based in Los Angeles to hear about making the movie.

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You’ve been acting since you were really young. Tell us a bit about your work up to now.

I’ve been doing this thing for a long time. I realized not long ago that my first professional acting gig was 18 years ago this year. I was incredibly timid and shy as a kid and started acting classes as a way to speak up a little. When I was pretending to be somebody else I had a confidence I never felt as myself. I was obsessed with the idea of storytelling and saw that as an actor I got to bring the story to life and be a vehicle for the message of that story. I recognized how powerful it was as a medium quite young.

‘Teenage Kicks’ is a very dark and sexy film. It’s a different direction from your previous work. What drew you to it?

Dark and sexy is a good summary of the film. I first encountered the film in it’s early incarnation as the short film version ‘Drowning’. I think I was 16 at the time, and up to that point I didn’t feel like the work I had been doing or the representations of adolescence on screen generally were really authentic. It mostly seemed to step past the agony and that fear that young people often experience. Every decision you make has this weight that feels like the effects will be permanent when you are figuring out who you are and who you want to be in the world. When I read ‘Drowning’ it felt honest and raw and spoke to a lot of the feelings I couldn’t quite articulate just yet. It felt like an important story to tell. There’s something magical about seeing a film and having that feeling of “me too” and that’s what excited me about ‘Drowning’ and ultimately ‘Teenage Kicks’. The opportunity of telling that story and giving voice to young people who had that feeling and maybe hadn’t felt represented before.

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We see an awful lot of you in ‘Teenage Kicks’ and there’s some pretty racy sex scenes? What was it like shooting them?

Honestly, when it comes to the sexy stuff in this film it is treated the same as any other scene. What’s great about the moments of sexual intimacy (or lack there-of) in the film are they all serve a purpose to the narrative. I only really get uncomfortable with those kind of scenes if it feels like the only purpose is to titillate. So long as it’s connected to the story and arc it feels important and organic. Also important to mention that there are moments of full-frontal nudity in this film. Which I would have no problem with, if it wasn’t for the fact that we shot this film in the dead of winter. People don’t realize how cold Sydney get’s in the winter. I didn’t have the luxury of warmth to make sure every inch of me was picture ready… if you know what I mean…

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‘Teenage Kicks’ is a pretty dark movie. Were there any lighter moments on set?

There were a few in retrospect. Although at the time because of the seriousness of the film we didn’t realize the hilarity of the moments… We shot a lot of scenes around this gorgeous pool at a mansion on top of a cliff overlooking the ocean. Which in theory is a fantastic location. But it had sat there unheated, chilled by the ocean breeze all winter. The pool was unimaginably cold. And considering I’d lost almost 20lbs for the role, I was chilled to the bone… We could only really be in the pool for thirty second intervals… Daniel Webber played my best friend and the object of my teen desire, Dan, and he and I would jump in, pulling happy faces trying to look all summery as our bodies were being frozen like ice blocks and then bolt to a warm shower until we had to jump in again. After about the third time of this sadistic torture method by Director Craig Boreham, we were on the floor of the shower, spooning in our underwear for body warmth, tears in our eyes, asking why we’d chosen this career path and if it was really worth it… Haha!

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‘Teenage Kicks’ is available to stream exclusively on Dekkoo!

 

Playing Gay for Pay: An Interview with John Suazo of ‘Coffee House Chronicles: The Movie’

We sat down in late February to talk with John Suazo, who plays the heteroflexible porn star and escort Kip in ‘Coffee House Chronicles: The Movie’, on Dekkoo. We wondered what it was like for a straight guy to be playing gay and bi in various film productions and web series the way he has.

Suazo’s first LGBT role was the J.C. Calciano-directed web series ‘Steam Room Stories’, also on Dekkoo, which was produced by fellow actor Nicholas Downs from ‘Coffee House Chronicles: The Movie’. Suazo said the producers asked, “‘Are you okay with twerking on camera?’ I said, ‘I’ll try.’” A legend was born.

Before he was modeling and acting, Suazo was in the Navy, and he was there when the infamously restrictive Don’t Ask Don’t Tell policy was repealed. Suazo says, “I had a couple of gay friends in the Navy. After the repeal a couple more came out. But as far as being accepting, I really hadn’t had gay friends until the military. And even though it is a very macho atmosphere, you work so hard and you sweat and bleed next to these people, and it really kind of opens your eyes to the fact that it doesn’t matter. Nobody’s trying to peek at me in the shower or try anything. They’re just people, and good guys.”

John Suazo by tommy+alan photography

When Suazo moved to Los Angeles, before he turned to acting, he found that a number of photographers wanted him to model for them, and demand rose for Suazo as an underwear model. Almost all of the photographers were terrific to work with, Suazo says, and he met a number of gay men who welcomed him into their broader artistic community.

Given the revelations of the #MeToo movement, did Suazo have any experiences with photographers taking liberties during that time? He says, “Any shady experiences I’ve had were very few, and they were when I was brand new to L.A.” But a few times, Suazo admits, he had to say, “That’s not a legitimate project!” Suazo even walked out on one name photographer who was acting inappropriately.

Fortunately Suazo had a number of colleagues and collaborators, gay and straight, who could keep him working with strong professional photographers, and that’s one of the things that contributed to his acting career.

And his LGBT roles have continued. In fact, at press time, Suazo was up for another gay role in a pilot. We asked him whether he senses straight actors having any trepidation taking on gay roles like they may have had in decades past. He replies with a wink, “Not real actors!” Then he adds, “I have met one or two out there that don’t want to take on a gay role or wouldn’t feel comfortable doing a scene where they have to be in love with a man. But every role you take on its not you, it’s not your real life. You’re playing somebody else.”

John Suazo by tommy+alan photography

Suazo recalls that one straight actor was accused of being gay on social media. “An interviewer asked him ‘If you’re straight, why haven’t you defended yourself?’ And he said ‘I don’t see the need to defend myself against something that’s not offensive.’”

And how about actors outing themselves as LGBTQI in today’s Hollywood? Suazo says, “Actors are far more comfortable being out.” He adds, “I come from Arizona and, growing up in a red state, it was not quite as accepting of different lifestyles. I could see the difference in California and Los Angeles where I’m surrounded by artists, and the culture and the atmosphere here is based on people expressing themselves. So I think it’s wonderful we’re very comfortable being who we are.”

And now Suazo has numerous productions under his belt, including multiple LGBT ones. And in case it isn’t clear, he loves his gay fans! Suazo gets recognized from his various productions, especially in his neighborhood of West Hollywood. Do those fans ever overidentify with his gay or bi characters and get flirtatious? Well, Suazo admits sometimes he has to resort to saying he has a girlfriend. That way, he says, he positions it as “It’s not you, it’s me.”

Suazo has been working on honing his already sharp comedy skills since his ‘Coffee House Chronicles’ shoot. He says, “You hit your beats better when you are taking it very seriously. And when you have some very funny writing behind you.” High praise to his shows’ writers!

As we wrapped up our conversation, we found out one last detail: that John Suazo has stunt driving experience. And he even went to stunt-driving school briefly. Now we wish there had been a chase scene in ‘Coffee House Chronicles: The Movie’.

Watch ‘Coffee House Chronicles: The Movie’ on Dekkoo!

 

Dekkoo sits down with creator and writer Pablo Andreu to discuss his series, ‘Stray’ coming to Dekkoo July 21!

On July 21, we will release ‘Stray’, a bromantic comedy series in which Jay, a brash gay dude, and Rich, a nerdy straight guy, talk sex and relationships while reconnecting in New York City years after college. We recently sat down with creator and writer Pablo Andreu to discuss ‘Stray’:

A quick perusal of gay pop culture websites and social media and its clear that gays have a fascination–if not fetish-like obsession–with straight, “bro” culture, yet there is scant evidence of the reverse, aside from homophobia.  We always thought us gays were the curious ones when it comes to mos vs. bros, not the straight guys, so when we heard about “Stray”, we assumed the show was created by a gay guy, but you’re straight! What inspired you to create a show about a mo-bro friendship?

Personal experience. The show is largely informed by a close friendship of mine, and I didn’t see anything out there that quite represented the dynamic my friend and I have (even though he and I are quite unlike the main characters on the show). Some shows represent and cater to gay men, and some shows –”mainstream” shows, whatever that is anymore – tend to default to tokenism when incorporating gay characters. I didn’t see a show in which a pair of male friends joke with each other, pick on each other, posture and share thoughts on sex and attraction, where sexual orientation is at once topical and incidental to the friendship.

When I was growing up, straight guys were a lot more uptight than we are today. Homophobia was a lot more common even in cities that tend to be more accepting and forward thinking. Today, at least in those same cities, most straight guys are pretty open-minded, but there’s still a certain level of ignorance and – dare I say it? – privilege. The show attempts to find humor in that well-meaning cluelessness.

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What is refreshing about the show is that you’ve eschewed stereotypical characters. Instead of a battle of clichés, you’ve given us a more realistic conversation between a swaggering bro-ish gay dude and a not-so-bro-ish, mild-mannered straight guy, which makes the show far more interesting. Clearly, this was on purpose, as it would have been so obvious to do the obvious. Tell us what you were thinking.

I wanted to do a couple of things: Strip away stereotypes, as you mentioned, and poke fun at the insecurities and hysteria that straight guys exhibit about their perceived masculinity (or lack thereof). As such, Jay had to be an unrepentantly in-your-face character to be able to tease out that insecurity virtually at will. Essentially, Jay bullies Rich, mostly for his own amusement (he’s no hero), although it does serve to inadvertently force Rich to confront some of his peccadilloes and assumptions. Without giving away too much, Rich will also help Jay make some of his own discoveries as the show progresses. Rich can’t be totally useless!

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In your hilarious “Diary of a Web Series” chronicling the making of “Stray” on Tubefilter, you wonder if you just cast a younger version of yourself as Rich, the straight guy in show, who, as your girlfriend pointed out, resembles you. Do the conversations between Rich and Jay also resemble those you’ve had with a gay friend in real life?

As I said, the show is informed by a close friendship I have, but the conversations in the show are not based on actual conversations my friend and I have had. One of the episodes, however, is sort of based on a series of conversations I had with my sister when I was a teenager. The episode in question is “Hot or Not,” in which Rich refuses to admit he can tell if another man is attractive. I had similar discussions with my sister when I was in high school in which I stubbornly made the same assertion. In retrospect, I can acknowledge it for what it was: fear of being perceived as unmanly.

There is one episode in the next season, however, that pretty closely resembles something that happened in real life. I went to two gay bars with my friend, one quite different from the other. Without giving away too much, Rich follows a similar path.

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In creating “Stray”, whom were you writing for? Curious straight guys? Curious gay guys? Who did you think would be your core audience? Who are your “Stray” fans? Break down the demographics, if you got ‘em.

I honestly didn’t know. The dynamic between the two main characters made me chuckle, so I figured I’d keep writing until I stopped chuckling. That’s how I always write: I get an idea that interests or amuses me, and I get going. I don’t think about demos and target audiences until afterward, which I’m sure is not the most effective way to go about it, but I find that my writing struggles if I saddle it with the marketing stuff during that process.

From a media standpoint, gay-themed blogs and publications have gravitated toward the show. I wouldn’t necessarily characterize STRAY as a gay-themed show, but I’m happy gay blogs and viewers have been responding well to the show.

More anecdotally, straight guys seem to be responding well to it too, but I have less evidence to support that claim.

I’m still gathering intel.

“Stray” is funny and frank, but also points out an overlooked and occasionally commented on truth that there are loads of gay guys out there who have much more in common with straight men than they do with straight women. Do you think this would surprise straight guys? (Hint: “Stray” is the perfect ice-breaking promo—or excuse—for a Mos & Bros Meet-Up.)

I think that’s spot on. Desire and attraction manifest quite similarly in gay guys and straight guys. The object of attraction just happens to be different.

I’m not sure how many straight guys that would surprise in New York, where I’m based, but it may surprise a fair bit of straight guys in the part of New Jersey where I grew up. I think there’s still broad swathes of straight guys out there who effeminize gay men in their heads. That’s partly why it was important for Jay to be the more traditionally masculine character on the show.

 

 

Jane Lynch and Paul Witten, stars of ‘Dropping The Soap’, on why Hollywood actors stay in the closet

The folks over at Gay Star News published a great interview with Jane Lynch and Paul Witten. Besides discussing their hilarious series, ‘Dropping the Soap‘ they also talk about why so many gay stars in Hollywood stay in the closet.

If you haven’t had a chance to watch ‘Dropping the Soap‘ we suggest you binge watch it immediately. With what’s going on in the world these days everyone could use a good laugh.